The Foundation Committee

The Foundation Committee is the educational and charitable arm of the NIP, charged to solicit, receive, and administer funds and property to advance the awareness and knowledge of naval and maritime intelligence. Its purpose is to support the Chief of Naval Operations Naval Intelligence Awards Program and to recognize and reward outstanding leadership and performance of military and civilian naval intelligence professionals throughout the community and to provide scholarships through the Rear Admiral Sumner Shapiro Scholarship Program. To ensure the continued funding for these awards and scholarships, the Foundation Committee draws upon support from the NIP membership and from other individual and corporate sponsors and supporters of naval intelligence.

Naval Intelligence Awards Program Awards

Each awardee recognition varies by award. See OPNAV INSTRUCTION 1650.26C (Enclosures 1 through 7)for full award guidance, criteria and recognition details.

RADM Thomas A. Brooks Junior Officer of the Year
(afloat and ashore)+/- more info

The Director of Naval Intelligence RADM Thomas A. Brooks Intelligence Junior Officer of the Year Award was established and endowed in 2002 by RADM Thomas A. Brooks, USN. The award recognizes junior officers for their leadership, performance, special accomplishments, and overall contribution to command efficiency, morale and welfare. There are currently three awards given each year in the following categories: afloat, ashore, and expeditionary. The winner is selected by boards convened at COMFLTFORCOM N2 and ONI each year to select a Junior Officer of the Year for each of the categories. The award consists of a commemorative wall plaque and a 5-year membership in Naval Intelligence Professionals (NIP).

Rear Admiral Brooks enlisted in the Naval Reserve in the mid-1950s, and came on active duty in 1958. He was commissioned via Officer Candidate School as a Special Duty Officer (Intelligence) and served some 33 years as a Naval Intelligence officer, retiring in 1991 as the Director of Naval Intelligence. He obtained his Bachelors degree from Fordham University and Masters degree from Fairleigh Dickinson University. Afloat and operational assignments have included Staff, Amphibious Group THREE; Commanding Officer, NISO Viet Nam; and N2, COMSECONDFLT. He served as the Assistant Naval Attach, Istanbul., Turkey; the Executive Secretary, CNO Executive Panel; Head, CNO Intelligence Plot; Officer-in Charge, FOSIC CINCLANTFLT; Commanding Officer, Navy Field Operational Intelligence Office, Ft Meade, MD; J-2, CINCLANT; and J-2, Joint Chiefs of Staff.

Upon retirement, RADM Brooks began a ten year career with AT&T, where he held a variety of positions. In 1995, he was appointed to the Defense Policy Board. He served on the Defense Science Board Summer Study of 1997, was also appointed to the Joint Security Commission in 1999, and as one of three Presidential appointees to the Security Policy Advisory Board from 1998 through 2001. From 2000 through 2006, he was a member of the President's Council for the National Labs at University of California. From 1999 through 2006, Admiral Brooks was an Adjunct Faculty member at the National Defense Intelligence College, where he has taught courses on Intelligence History, Warning, and Industry-Intelligence Relations. He is past president of Naval Intelligence Professionals, past president of National Military Intelligence Association, and past Board member of Security Affairs Support Association.

 

Herman Dworkin for Maritime Analytic Excellence+/- more info

The Herman Dworkin award is presented annually to the civilian or military analyst working maritime issues who exemplifies, through his/her work and attitude, Mr. Dworkin's traits of analytic expertise, strength of character, initiative, industriousness and exactitude. The "Herman Dworkin award for excellence in Soviet naval analysis" was established jointly in 1983 by the Director, DIA and the Director of Naval Intelligence. In 2001, the award name and criteria, by direction of DIA and Naval Intelligence seniors were modified to be more inclusive, by removing all geographic inference.

The award, it should be noted, is not necessarily to identify the single best analyst, but rather to choose a member of the naval and maritime analytic community (either regional or functional specialty), who is viewed as an exemplary representative of the group as a whole, an individual routinely performing in a fashion characteristic of Mr. Dworkin. Herm, as he was fondly known on both sides of the Atlantic, served in both ONI and DIA for over 20 years as an outstanding analyst and a highly respected representative of the United States Intelligence Community in many international fora, before his untimely death in 1982.

The award consists of a commemorative wall plaque and a 5 year membership in NIP. In addition, the winner's name is placed on a large wall plaque kept on display at the Office of Naval Intelligence.

 

Rear Admiral Edwin T. Layton Leadership+/- more info

The Rear Admiral Edwin T. Layton Leadership Award recognizes outstanding leadership and mentorship in the furtherance of naval intelligence performance.

NIF - Navy League for Exceptional Leadership +/- more info

The Chief of Naval Operations Naval Intelligence Foundation (NIF) Navy League Award for Exceptional Leadership is presented annually to recognize leadership in providing excellence in operational intelligence support to the Fleet. Any Navy, Marine Corps, or Coast Guard officer, O-4 through O-6, serving in an intelligence billet is eligible to receive the award, which was established in 2000. An awards committee composed of NIP and NLUS members selects the winner winner who is awarded a certificate of recognition, a commemorative wall plaque, an engraved "spy" telescope, an engraved watch, and a 5-year membership in Navy Intelligence Professionals.

 

CDR Dan F. Shanower Intelligence Specialist of the Year, (junior and senior; afloat and ashore)+/- more info

The Chief of Naval Operations Commander Dan F. Shanower Intelligence Specialist of the Year Award was established in 1995 and endowed by the family of CDR Shanower in 2002. The award recognizes leadership, performance of duty, special accomplishments, and overall contribution to command efficiency, morale, and welfare of the command to which the individual is assigned. Four awards are given annually: both a junior (E1-E4) award and a senior (E5-E6) award to Intelligence Specialists assigned to an afloat/operational command and a junior and senior award to Intelligence Specialists assigned to a shore-based command. The award consists of a Certificate of Recognition, a $250 cash award, and a 1-year membership in the Naval Intelligence Professionals.

CDR Dan F. Shanower was born on February 7, 1961 in Naperville, Illinois. He attended Carroll College in Waukesha, Wisconsin, graduating in 1983 with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Political Science. He attended Aviation Officer School in Pensacola, Florida and received his commission as an Ensign in June 1985. After intelligence officer training, he reported to VAQ-136 onboard U.S.S. Midway as Squadron Intelligence Officer. In September 1988, he was assigned as Officer-in-Charge of the Pacific Fleet Area Support Team Detachment, Subic Bay, Philippines. Following this tour, he transitioned to the Naval Reserve, serving from August 1990 to October 1994 as a Foreign Service Officer with the U.S. State Department in the Philippines.

CDR Shanower was recalled to active duty in November 1994 and reported to the Navy & Marine Corps Intelligence Training Center as a student. He was assigned to the Joint Intelligence Center, Pacific Detachment Japan in December 1994 as Operations Support Department Head. In 1997, he received orders to the staff of the Commander, U.S. Third Fleet in San Diego, California as the Assistant Intelligence Officer.

In 1999, CDR Shanower reported to the Office of Naval Intelligence in Washington, DC. In August 2000, he was selected as the Officer-in-Charge of the CNO Intelligence Plot. There he was responsible for the provision of current intelligence support to the Navy Secretariat, Chief of Naval Operations staff, and the Director of Naval Intelligence. In December 2000, he was promoted to the rank of Commander. CDR Shanower was killed in the attack on the Pentagon on 11 September 2001.

 

VADM Rufus L. Taylor for Leadership+/- more info

The Vice Admiral Rufus L. Taylor Award for Leadership recognizes deserving active or reserve component officer, enlisted, or civilian personnel who exemplify excellence and exceptional dedication to duty within the naval intelligence community.

Vice Admiral Taylor was born in 1910 in ST Louis, MO and graduated from the US Naval Academy in 1933. He began what was to be a long connection with the Naval Intelligence community as a Japanese language student stationed in Japan from 1938 to 1941. He was next assigned to the Philippines and was with the Intelligence Unit on Corregidor at the time of the surrender of the islands to the Japanese. After evacuation by motorboat and submarine to Australia, he served on the staff of the Commander, Allied Naval Forces, Southwestern Pacific until 1943.

During the remainder of the war, he served with the Office of Naval Intelligence in Washington and with FRUPAC in Hawaii. He served with the occupation forces in Japan after the end of the war. After further sea duty, he returned to Washington and was assigned to the National Security Agency. Following additional intelligence assignments with the Pacific Fleet, he returned to Washington in 1959 where he held a number of naval intelligence posts, including duty as the Director, Naval Intelligence. This was followed by duty as the Deputy Director, Defense Intelligence Agency and as Deputy Director of the Central Intelligence Agency where he served until his retirement in 1969.

 

VADM Rufus L. Taylor for Excellence in Instruction+/- more info

The Vice Admiral Rufus L. Taylor Award for Excellence in Instruction was the first award presented by the Naval Intelligence Foundation. In fact, the money donated to endow this award in October 1986 by Mrs. Rufus Taylor, occasioned the need for the Foundation. The award recognizes clearly demonstrated excellence in naval intelligence instruction and is given annually to one Navy or Marine Corps instructor, faculty, or staff at both the Center for Information Warfare Unit Hampton Roads (formerly: Navy Marine Corps Intelligence Training Center-NMITC) and the Center for Information Warfare Unit San Diego (formerly Fleet Intelligence Training Center Pacific - FITCPAC). The award consists of a commemorative wall plaque, an engraved "spy" telescope, and a 5-year membership in the Naval Intelligence Professionals.

Vice Admiral Taylor was born in 1910 in ST Louis, MO and graduated from the US Naval Academy in 1933. He began what was to be a long connection with the Naval Intelligence community as a Japanese language student stationed in Japan from 1938 to 1941. He was next assigned to the Philippines and was with the Intelligence Unit on Corregidor at the time of the surrender of the islands to the Japanese. After evacuation by motorboat and submarine to Australia, he served on the staff of the Commander, Allied Naval Forces, Southwestern Pacific until 1943.

During the remainder of the war, he served with the Office of Naval Intelligence in Washington and with FRUPAC in Hawaii. He served with the occupation forces in Japan after the end of the war. After further sea duty, he returned to Washington and was assigned to the National Security Agency. Following additional intelligence assignments with the Pacific Fleet, he returned to Washington in 1959 where he held a number of naval intelligence posts, including duty as the Director, Naval Intelligence. This was followed by duty as the Deputy Director, Defense Intelligence Agency and as Deputy Director of the Central Intelligence Agency where he served until his retirement in 1969.

 

National Intelligence University (NIU) Ann Caracristi +/- more info

The National Defense Intelligence College (NDIC) Ann Caracristi award was established in 2002 to recognize postgraduate academic excellence in the field of intelligence at the NDIC. All sea service students enrolled in the postgraduate program at NDIC are eligible for the award and the winner is selected by a faculty committee. The award consists of a commemorative wall plaque, an engraved telescope and a 5-year membership in Naval Intelligence Professionals.

The Deputy Director of the National Security Agency from January 1980 to August 1982, Miss Caracristi has had a career in intelligence that dates from World War II. Since her retirement she has served on several commissions, boards and committees related to national security. She was a member of the President's Foreign Intelligence Advisory Board and of the Intelligence Oversight Board from 1993 until 2001. During these years she also served on the Board of Visitors of the Joint Military Intelligence College, as a consultant to the NSA Scientific Advisory Board and as a member of the DCI/Secretary of Defense Joint Security Commission. She was a member of the Commission on the Roles and Capabilities of the United States Intelligence Community and of the National Research Council's Committee to Study National Cryptography Policy. She served on the Chief of Naval Operations Executive Panel from 1982 until 1991 and was on the Board of Visitors of the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center from 1991 until 1993. She chaired a Director of Central Intelligence Task Force on Intelligence Community Training from September 1992 to January 1993.

Miss Caracristi holds a BA degree from Russell Sage College and is a graduate of the Federal Executive Institute. Her awards and honors include the Department of Defense Distinguished Civilian Service Award, the National Intelligence Distinguished Service Medal and the United States National Security Award. She was an original and long-time member of the Naval Intelligence Foundation Board of Advisors, and was the originator and strong proponent of the idea for a NIF Award at JMIC now NDIC. Consequently, to honor her contributions, NIF named the JMIC/NDIC award for her.

 

ADM B.R. Inman Naval Post Graduate School (NPS) +/- more info

The Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) ADM B.R. Inman Award is presented annually to a U.S. Sea Service officer attending NPS in recognition of that student's outstanding contribution to the field of maritime intelligence. Instituted in 1996, the award is endowed by ADM B.R. Inman, USN (ret) and consists of a commemorative wall plaque, an engraved telescope, and a 5-year membership in NIP. The NPS Senior Intelligence Officer is the selecting official for the award.

During a 31-year military career that included some of the most sensitive national security posts in government, ADM Bobby Ray Inman earned a reputation as one of the nation's finest intelligence officers. He was born in 1931 in the small town of Rhonesboro, Texas. After graduating from high school at age 15 and the University of Texas at age 19, he joined the Naval Reserve in 1951 and was commissioned an Ensign in 1952. He then spent 19 years as an analyst for Naval Intelligence, serving on an aircraft carrier, two cruisers and a destroyer, as well as in a variety of onshore assignments.

In 1972, ADM Inman graduated from the Naval War College and became the Executive Assistant to the Vice Chief of Naval Operations. He then served as the Assistant Chief of Staff for Intelligence of the Pacific Fleet in 1973, Director of Naval Intelligence in 1974, and Vice Director of the Defense Intelligence Agency in 1976. He was named director of the National Security Agency in 1977. In 1981, Inman was nominated to be the Deputy Director of Central Intelligence. He served in that position until March 1982. At that time, he became the first naval intelligence specialist ever to earn the rank of four-star Admiral. Since leaving the Navy, ADM Inman has been involved in several business ventures, served on a variety of corporate boards, and acted as an outside advisor to three Presidents, the State Department, and Congress.

 

ADM Ike Kidd Naval War College+/- more info

The Naval War College ADM Ike Kidd Award was established in 1996 to recognize that in-residence student at the Naval War College whose professional essay is considered to have made the most significant contribution to maritime intelligence support within a joint force operational context. The winner is selected by a faculty committee chaired by the Layton Military Chair of Intelligence. The award consists of a $500 cash award and a 5-year membership in Naval Intelligence Professionals (NIP).

This award is endowed by the family of ADM Isaac Campbell Kidd Jr. Admiral Kidd retired in 1978 as Commander in Chief of the Atlantic Fleet and Supreme Commander of NATO forces in the Atlantic. He then put his expertise to work for various public agencies in Washington, lectured widely on maritime law in the United States and abroad and taught a course on the subject at the College of William and Mary.

The admiral, who was known as Ike, was born into a Navy family in Cleveland and graduated from the United States Naval Academy, at Annapolis, in 1942. His father, Rear Adm. Isaac Kidd Sr., was killed in the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941, aboard his flagship, the USS Arizona. As a newly commissioned officer, Ensign Kidd was assigned to convoy duty in the North Atlantic. He later served as a gunnery officer aboard a destroyer in the Allied landings in Sicily and Italy, and finished the war in the Pacific theater.

He received his first destroyer command shortly after the war ended, and then alternated between sea and shore assignments before becoming a full admiral in 1971. In 23 years of sea duty, he commanded destroyers, destroyer divisions and Navy fleets in the Mediterranean, the Pacific and the Atlantic. As the Navy Chief of Materiel in the early 1970?s, he oversaw Navy procurement, logistics and labor relations and supervised 350,000 uniformed and civilian personnel.

Admiral Kidd led an inquiry into the Israeli attack on the American intelligence ship Liberty in the Mediterranean off the Sinai Peninsula during the 1967 Arab-Israeli war, an attack that killed 34 officers and men and wounded 171 others. Israel said the Liberty had been mistaken for an Egyptian ship, but the inquiry concluded that the Israeli attack was unprovoked.

 

ADM Robert L.J. Long +/- more info

The US Naval Academy ADM Robert L. J. Long, USN Award was established in 1997 to recognize that graduating Midshipman who achieved the highest level of academic achievement in the USNA Honors Program. The winner is selected by a faculty committee composed of the Department Heads (or their representatives) of the six Academic Departments which comprise the Honors Program. chaired by the Layton Military Chair of Intelligence. The award consists of a commemorative wall plaque, an engraved telescope and a 5-year membership in Naval Intelligence Professionals (NIP).

This award is endowed by the family of ADM Robert L. J. Long, USN. ADM Long was born in Kansas City, Missouri and grew up there. He graduated from the US Naval Academy in 1943, served on the battleship USS Colorado in the Pacific and entered the submarine service after World War II. Admiral Long saw combat in the Vietnam conflict and commanded the USS Sea Leopard, a diesel-powered submarine, the USS Patrick Henry and the USS Casimir Pulaski, nuclear-powered ballistic missile submarines. He also commanded the Submarine Force, United States Atlantic fleet; Submarines, Allied Command; and Submarine Force, Western Atlantic area. He was Executive Assistant and Naval Aide to the Under Secretary of the Navy; Deputy Chief of Naval Operations and Vice Chief of Naval Operations. Admiral Long's final posting was as the Commander in Chief, US Pacific Command from 1979 to 1983.

Following his retirement from the Navy in 1983, Admiral Long was active in a variety of governmental and the military affairs. He served as the principal executive of President Ronald Reagan's fact-finding committee, the Long Commission, that investigated the 1983 Beirut barracks bombing attack that killed 241 U.S. Marines. He participated in the Security Review Commission led by General Richard Stilwell that grew out of the Walker spy case and which was tasked with review of security procedures conducted for security clearances. Admiral Long served on several corporate boards, including Northrop, ConTel, and GTE prior to his death in 2002.

 

RADM Donald M. Showers NIOBC (six per year)+/- more info

The Navy and Marine Corps Intelligence Training Center (NMITC) RADM Donald M. "Mac" Showers Award has been presented since 1999. The recipients are the Honor Graduates of each Naval Intelligence Officer Basic Course (NIOBC). The Honor Graduate is that officer with the highest grade point average in his or her class. The award consists of a Certification of Recognition and a 5-year membership in the Naval Intelligence Professionals.

A veteran of World War II service as an intelligence officer in the Pacific theater, RADM Showers enlisted in the Naval Reserve in August 1940, was commissioned in September 1941, and completed 31 years of continuous active duty in 1972. Following retirement from the Navy, he served an additional 12 years with the Central Intelligence Agency as a civilian.

The highlight of his intelligence career was the fortunate assignment in February 1942 to the Combat Intelligence Unit in Pearl Harbor. Under the command of CDR Joseph J. Rochefort, he participated in successful work to support Admiral Nimitz and the Pacific Fleet with vital intelligence gained from decrypts of Japanese naval messages. This support included the Battle of Coral Sea, the Battle of Midway, the Guadalcanal operations, and other Pacific Fleet engagements for the duration of the war.

In January 1945, he was transferred from duty with the Fleet Radio Unit and the Joint Intelligence Center to the Advanced Headquarters staff of Admiral Nimitz on Guam as Assistant Fleet Intelligence officer under Captain E. T. Layton. His service in this position continued through April 1946.

After transfer to the U. S. Navy as an intelligence specialist in 1946, Admiral Showers continued duties in operational intelligence on the CNO Staff with subsequent tours on Navy staffs in Europe, San Diego, and the Pacific Fleet in Hawaii. His last assignment before retirement was as Chief of Staff of the Defense Intelligence Agency in the Pentagon.

 

LCDR John G. Tilson Navy Reserve Intelligence
Analyst of the Year +/- more info

The LCDR John G. Tilson Navy Reserve Intelligence Analyst of the Year Award was established in 1999. The award recognizes outstanding intelligence analysis performed during reserve drills, Annual Training (AT), Active Duty for Training (ADT), or Active Duty for Special Work (ADSW). Any member of the Selected Reserve serving in a Commander, Navy Intelligence Reserve Command (CNIRC) mobilization billet is eligible for the award and the winner is selected annually by CNIRC from among nominations submitted by all Navy Intelligence Reserve Regions (NIRRs). The award consists of a commemorative wall plaque, an engraved telescope and a 5-year membership in Naval Intelligence Professionals.

The Navy Reserve Intelligence Analyst of the Year award has been in existence since 1999, but in 2010 was renamed the LCDR John G. Tilson Navy Reserve Intelligence Analyst of the Year Award. This award is being endowed by the many friends of LCDR Tilson as well as various supporters of the superb service offered to our Navy and our country by the Navy Intelligence Reserve community.

LCDR Tilson was commissioned an Ensign in the US Navy in 1986; he is a graduate of University of Portland and received his Masters degree in International Relations from Portland State University in 1985. His initial assignment was with Attack Squadron VA-185 aboard the USS Midway. He then served in Hawaii at both Camp Smith and Pearl Harbor from 1989 until 1992. His next duty station was the Fleet Ocean Surveillance Information Facility (FOSIF) in Rota, Spain, where he served as a watch officer and Naval analyst. In December 1995 he separated from active duty, joined the Naval Intelligence Reserve community, and took a position as a civilian maritime intelligence analyst at the Joint Analysis Center (JAC) at RAF Molesworth, UK. He performed admirably as a Reserve Naval Intelligence officer and was mobilized multiple times in support of US operations in the Balkans and elsewhere in the Mediterranean until his untimely death in 2004.

 

CAPT Sidney E. Wood ONI Junior Officer of the Year+/- more info

The Captain Sidney E. Wood Office of Naval Intelligence (ONI) Junior Officer of the Year Award is presented annually to that Junior Officer serving at the ONI who has served with distinction as demonstrated by leadership, performance, special accomplishments, and overall contribution to command efficiency, morale, and welfare. The award was established and endowed by Captain Wood in 2009 and consists of a commemorative wall plaque and one-year membership in Naval Intelligence Professionals. The winner is selected by the Commander, ONI.

Born in Macon, GA, Captain Wood graduated from Mercer University in 1957 and was commissioned an Ensign in the U.S. Navy. He began his service at the ONI in the CNO Chart Room (later the Intelligence Plot), where he served as Intelligence Watch Officer and later as CNO Intelligence Briefer for Admiral Arleigh Burke. During this tour he designed and supervised construction of White House Situation Room, and conducted the first overnight watch in same. His early operational tours (1961-1970) included duty with Commander, Amphibious Group One, operating out of Subic Bay, Philippines, as Squadron Intelligence Officer for Fleet Air Reconnaissance Squadron One, during which he served multiple assignments as Detachment Intelligence Officer at DaNang Air Base, Vietnam, and with Staff, Commander, Seventh Fleet, operating in the South China Sea and Gulf of Tonkin.

Shore tours included assignments at the Naval Scientific & Technical Intelligence Center; as Naval Attach in Helsinki, Finland; as Senior Intelligence Officer for the Oceanographer of the Navy and the Chief of Naval Material; as Deputy N2, Staff Commander in Chief U.S. Naval Forces Europe; and as Director, Plans, Policy, and Estimates in the Office of Naval Intelligence. He returned to Europe as the Deputy J2, Staff, Commander in Chief, U.S. Forces Europe from 1982 to 1984. After serving briefly as Special Assistant to the DNI, he retired from the Navy in 1985.

Since retirement, he has worked at SAIC supporting CIA, DIA, NGA, and Naval Research Laboratory contracts. Captain Wood has served in several key positions for the NIF since its inception, serving as Secretary from 1989 to 2000, as Vice President from 2000-2002, and as President from 2002-2010.

Office of Naval Intelligence Civilian Leadership +/- more info

The Navy Intelligence Professionals Office of Naval Intelligence Civilian Leadership Award was established in 2012 through the generous endowment of Captain William J. Manthorpe, Jr., USN (ret). It recognizes civilian employees of ONI for their leadership, performance, special accomplishments, and overall contribution to command efficiency, morale and welfare. All current civilian employees of the Office of Naval Intelligence are eligible. The award consists of a Commemorative wall plaque and a 5-year membership in NIP.

NIP Capital Chapter ONI Sailors of the Year +/- more info

The NIP Capitol Chapter, Office of Naval Intelligence (ONI) Sailors of the Year Award was established in 1995 to recognize exemplary performance, devotion to duty, professionalism, technical competence and leadership of sailors serving at ONI. Currently, one Blue Jacket (E1 E3; added in 2007), one Junior (E4 & E-5) and one Senior (E-6) active duty and one reserve duty enlisted (added in 2005) personnel assigned to ONI are chosen by a selection board convened by Commander, ONI. The award consists of a Certificate of Recognition, $100 cash award and 1-year membership in NIP.

 

"C" School Outstanding Graduate +/- more info

The Navy-Marine Corps Intelligence Training Center Intelligence Specialist (IS) "C" School Outstanding Graduate Award was established in 2006. It recognizes the Outstanding Graduate of each IS "C" School graduating class and all USN or USNR students attending IS "C" School are eligible for the award. The winner is that "C" School student with the highest GPA, who is also an outstanding sailor in his or her graduating class, as decided by the course instructor. The award consists of a certificate of recognition. Those graduates who also achieve a GPA of 96 or higher (95 for Imagery "C" School), also receive a 1-year membership in the Naval Intelligence Professionals.

 

Naval Intelligence Essay Contest

The Naval Intelligence Professionals (NIP) Essay Contest was established in 2002. NIP sponsors this contest to encourage the development of a dialogue and in-depth examination on subjects of professional value to the Naval Intelligence Community of Interest.

+/- more info

Each year NIP will identify a theme pertaining to maritime intelligence or intelligence support to naval forces. Any author, officer, enlisted, military or civilian, foreign or domestic, is eligible to enter with an original composition related to the annual theme. This contest is now conducted in cooperation with the United States Naval Institute (USNI) and rules and deadlines are published on both the NIP and USNI web sites. The first place essay will be published in the USNI Proceedings and may be published in the online NIP Quarterly. The author will receive a commemorative wall plaque, a $5,000 cash prize, a 5-year membership to NIP and a one-year USNI membership. The 2nd Place and 3rd Place authors will receive $2,500 and $1,500 cash prizes, respectively, and 1-year memberships to NIP and USNI.

Awardees

2015

No Contest

2014

1st Prize: Captain Mark D. Houff, USN
2nd Prize: Ms. Reychal Windham
3rd Prize:First Lieutenant Adam Davis, USA

2013

1st Prize: Commander Mark D. Houff, USN
2nd Prize: Mr. Ryan D. Martinson
3rd Prize:Ms. Jacquelyn Schneider

2012

1st Prize: Commander Mark D. Houff, USN
2nd Prize: Mr. Thanh Dinh
3rd Prize:Ms. Jacquelyn Schneider

2011

1st Prize: Mr. Steve Coonen
2nd Prize: LT Daniel T. Murphy, USN
3rd Prize-Expeditionary:LTC Gregory Motes, USA

2010

No contest

2009

1st Prize: CDR D. Mark Houff, USN
2nd Prize:CAPT Mark D. Dowd, USNR

2008

1st Prize: CAPT Paul B. Becker, USN
2nd Prize:LTJG Edward P. Wynne, USN

2007

1st Prize: LCDR Rory Berke, USN
2nd Prize:LCDR Robert F. Hight, Jr, USN

2006

1st Prize: Mr. Jose Delgado
2nd Prize:LT David Barr, USN

2005

1st Prize: LCDR James Griffin, USN
2nd Prize:CDR William R. Bray, USN

2004

1st Prize:CDR Jason Hines, USN

2003

1st Prize: LCDR Michael Studeman,USN

View 2016 Essay Contest Guidelines